Thursday, March 29, 2012

Sleepy Eye Yes! team saves energy by replacing light bulbs

Students at Sleepy Eye Public and St. Mary’s School’s are fueling the winds of change.
This school year is the first year the YES! (Youth Energy Summit) Team was formed by environmental science teachers Deb Reinarts and Mary Beth Botz.
Already they are making great strides.
Their most recent project was replacing old light bulbs in several apartment complexs around the Sleepy Eye area with energy efficient CFL light bulbs.
While this may not seem like a major impact, Sleepy Eye Public Works Director, Bob Elston, told the group that with their work the team reduced 46 kilowatt hour per year, per light bulb.
To put it in perspective Bob told the team gathered that each home in Sleepy Eye uses approximately 8,928 kilowatt hours of energy per year. From replacing the light bulbs in three apartment complexes, the group saved enough energy to power four homes in Sleepy Eye for one year.
“You haven’t taken functionality away and you didn’t force a change in human behavior,” Bob said.
He commended the group for their efforts saying that he couldn’t do by himself what this group accomplished.
“You guys have a bigger effect on your households than I could have,” he added.
Bob went on to explain to the group the energy changes that the government has mandated in the coming years.
For example, the power plant is mandated to reduce non-renewable energy use by 1.5 percent per year. The next mandate, Bob explained, is for the community of Sleepy Eye to be using 17 percent of energy in renewable resources. By the year 2025, a mandate says that 25 percent of energy used should be from renewable resources.
He explained that currently Sleepy Eye uses 13 percent of renewable energy in the form of wind energy. Solar and wind energy are the two most popular forms renewable energy resources, he said.
The Sleepy Eye YES! Team is a group of students that will attempt to educate and work on environmental issues both at their schools and in the community.
Students from both of the schools’ environmental science classes are finding ways to make Sleepy Eye more environmentally friendly.
YES! empowers students to partner with their community to create economic and environmental vitality through hands-on learning and team-based projects.
Projects the YES! Team have worked on this year included a “Black out Day,” where as much energy as possible was conserved during a specific school day,  a light bulb exchange where students collected unusable Christmas lights, and a Biggest Loser locker clean out where items collected were recycled.
Source: Sleepy Eye News

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Let there be light: GE bulb from 1912 still works

 
Five of the century-old light bulbs were discovered in a time capsule buried 100 years ago at GE's Lighting's Nela Park world headquarters. One of them still worked.

Talk about illuminating the past. In preparation for the 100th anniversary of an industrial park in the Cleveland area next year, GE Lighting dug up a time capsule at one of Nela Park's original buildings. The capsule itself contained some artifacts like a local paper and photographs.
But the real find was buried in sand above the capsule: Five incandescent light bulbs, at least one of which still worked when plugged in. 

GE spokesman David Schuellerman said via email the company thought the bulbs were buried inside the capsule, making the fact that any of them survived even more remarkable. One bulb was full of water and the other had condensation on the inside, but the other three "appeared in working order,"  he said. One bulb plugged in at the site of the time capsule ceremony did, in fact, work. Schuellerman said a repeat test was done later in a lab on that bulb and it worked a second time.

"We believe the bulb that we successfully tested was a 40-watt tungsten filament incandescent bulb," he said. Both tungsten and carbon filament bulbs were buried with the time capsule. Schuellerman said the company might test the other two bulbs once it determined what kind they were.

For now, the bulbs are in a Nela Park lab. "We’re cleaning and examining them, using etchings on the glass and written records to determine 1912 performance metrics such as light output," Schuellerman said. Eventually, the bulbs will be put on display at the GE Lighting Institute at Nela Park.

Source: MSNBC

Monday, March 26, 2012

BulbAmerica Announces Their Partnership With Renowned LED Light Bulb Manufacturer Kobi Electric



Quote startKobi Electric guarantees lumen maintenance of at least 80 percent as well as a lifetime warranty for all their productsQuote end

 The leading wholesale retailer of quality lighting fixtures and light bulbs BulbAmerica announced their partnership with the internationally acclaimed provider of high quality and cost effective LED light bulbs Kobi Electric. 

A strategic partnership between BulbAmerica, the largest wholesale provider of quality lighting fixtures and light bulbs in the United States and Texas based low priced LED lighting manufacturer Kobi Electric was recently announced. This collaboration will not only ensure that customers enjoy the dual advantages of affordability and quality but also mark the beginning of the development of newer and better product lines. Established in 1996, the global procurement company Kobi Group is a supplier of industrial materials, including electrical, instrumentation, telecommunication and mechanical products. Their clients include Petrochemical, Oil/Gas, Power, Drilling and Mining industries. Kobi Electric, a division of Kobi Group has a 22,000 square foot warehouse in Burleson, TX where they store their entire inventory.

A lighting expert at BulbAmerica.com commented, “We have always been on the lookout for the best and the most efficient ways to help our customers reduce their electricity bills” adding that “This recent partnership with Kobi Electric clearly demonstrates our dedication and commitment to our goal of finding the best possible lighting solutions.” Both the companies share this motto of delivering advanced technology and low priced lighting products to the end user. With this strategic partnership, some of the best LED lighting products will now be available at competitive prices and these include products that have already garnered plenty of positive feedback from the customers.

A force to reckon with, BulbAmerica has already carved a niche for itself in the lighting industry while Kobi Electric guarantees lumen maintenance of at least 80 percent as well as a lifetime warranty for all their products. These have received 4 and 5 star reviews along with high ratings consistently. Their purpose is to make home LED lighting affordable for everyone and the team travels across the globe to find low cost lighting solutions that also meet the company’s stringent and high standards of quality. Designed through a collaborative process with expert engineers, the end result of the process are high quality and cost effective LED lights that stand apart from their competitors in the market.

BulbAmerica offers a wide array of quality LED light bulbs, stage, and studio products from internationally renowned and trusted brands like Ushio, Osram-Sylvania, Feit Electric, etc. Focused on offering customers quality and energy efficient lighting products, they have been a part of the industry for about 10 years now. To know more about the different product and lighting solutions that they offer at BulbAmerica, visit http://www.bulbamerica.com or call 1-877-650-0775.

Source: PR Web


 

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Mitt Romney: Obama Killed The Thomas Edison Light Bulb

Mitt Romney went after President Barack Obama on Monday for supposedly banning incandescent light bulbs.
But the legislation in question was passed during the administration of President George W. Bush and did not ban those types of bulbs.

"The government would have banned Thomas Edison’s light bulb," Romney declared at the University of Chicago. "Oh yeah, Obama’s regulators actually did."

Attacking standards on light bulbs has become a familiar trope for conservatives, who often use the issue to insist that the government is over regulating and limiting the freedom of consumers. Former presidential candidate Michele Bachmann often mentioned the law in her speeches, and Iowa Rep. Steve King has said he fought "Stasi troops" under then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to continue using energy-inefficient light bulbs.
The law sets standards and eventually phases out the sale of energy-inefficient light bulbs, but doesn't force any particular form of lighting on anyone.

Even though a ban on U.S. sales of energy-inefficient incandescent light bulbs began this year, American stores still market an incandescent light bulb that uses less energy.

Still, mentioning a light bulb ban provided a useful sound bite for Romney when discussing regulations that he said kill innovation.

"The reality is that, under President Obama’s administration, these pioneers would have found it much more difficult, if not impossible, to innovate, invent and create," Romney said, referring to Steve Jobs, Thomas Edison, Bill Gates and the Wright brothers.

"A regulator would have shut down the Wright brothers for their 'dust pollution,'" he added.

Source: Huffington Post

LED light bulb represents rapidly advancing innovations




The March 12 article on the L-prize winning LED light bulb ("A $50 light bulb?") missed an opportunity to inform readers about the rapidly advancing and highly beneficial innovations that LED light bulbs represent. We might still be lighting our homes with candles if Thomas Edison had been subject to the derision of reports such as this and the current crop of conservative pundits who undermine concerted efforts to save energy.
Contrary to the headline and the graphic, good quality LED bulbs are available for under $10 and each saves literally hundreds of dollars in electricity costs over its lifespan. The graph implies that 1,800 kilowatt hours of electricity only cost $18, or 1 cent per kilowatt hour.

In fact, at current rates in New Jersey, that much electricity costs more than $300 ($250 more than the LED bulb described) and contributes more than a ton of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.
At the scale you used in the graph, the true cost of the incandescent bulbs would be too large to fit on a Star-Ledger page.

Concerted efforts by business and government are bringing exciting innovations to energy. Almost all of us have an interest in understanding them and helping speed their adoption.
Incandescent bulbs served us well in the last century, but have been left behind. And I'll still use candles for a romantic meal.

Source: NJ.com

Monday, March 19, 2012

BulbAmerica.com to Ring in Spring and St. Patrick's Day with Eco Friendly Light Bulbs

Quote startThe month of March represents all things green. With St. Patrick’s Day just round the corner, we decided to celebrate spring and everything associated with the color greenQuote end

BulbAmerica is supporting the government’s move to promote energy efficient and eco friendly light bulbs. The leading provider of various lighting systems and solutions will celebrate spring and St. Patrick’s Day by encouraging people to switch to the new compact fluorescent light bulbs.

The increasing focus on ‘Going Green’ and conserving our non renewable resources are primarily responsible for the government’s decision to implement a transition to more energy efficient and eco-friendly lighting within the next three years. The largest provider of light bulbs in the US, BulbAmerica reported that people can say goodbye to all the high wattage bulbs; 100, 200, and 300 watt bulbs by the end of this year. These incandescent bulbs consume plenty of energy and while they have been the standard for decades now, these will soon make way for compact and more energy efficient light bulbs. As a part of their goal to reduce their carbon footprint and conserve energy, the company hopes to promote the use of these compact fluorescent bulbs at the beginning of the year.
They are ringing in the onset of spring and have decided to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in a unique way by encouraging customers to switch to these eco friendly light bulbs instead of waiting for the incandescent to be taken off the shelves. The new range of energy efficient light bulbs consume only 14 -15 watts of energy to create 60 watts of brightness. The overall energy consumption is around one fourth of that consumed by incandescent light bulbs for the same brightness.
These bulbs that use newer technology are cheaper as they last four times as long as the soon-to-be-phased-out standard bulbs. A lighting expert at BulbAmerica.com explains, “The month of March represents all things green. With St. Patrick’s Day just round the corner, we decided to celebrate spring and everything associated with the color green by giving people an opportunity to take their first step towards being eco-friendly by simply changing a light bulb.” BulbAmerica offers customers a number of energy efficient lighting fixtures and bulbs that reduce their expenses on energy bills and these new compact fluorescents will cost around $4-$5.
With an exhaustive inventory of over 18,750 items available for shipment every business day and a customer base of 150,000+, the company BulbAmerica has achieved several milestones. The extensive sub-departments of the United State’s largest wholesale provider of quality lighting fixtures and light bulbs are renowned for their efficiency and rapid delivery of orders. Their online store can be accessed at http://www.BulbAmerica.com and for more information regarding the products they offer, call 1-877-650-0775.

Source: PR Web

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

BulbAmerica Expands Their Inventory of Energy Efficient Lighting Technologies Supporting the Nation’s Move towards Clean Energy


Quote startCustomers will make this switch to more energy efficient light bulbs that offer immediate savings on electricity bills” adding that, “It is measures like these that will help us reduce our carbon footprint and also minimize our overall energy consumptionQuote end

With major legislative changes announced in the use of incandescent light bulbs, energy consumption trends are expected to take a positive turn. BulbAmerica is now offering a new product line of CFL, LED, and high efficiency incandescent light bulbs that will replace these standard bulbs soon.

Businesses and manufacturers nationwide have been ordered to stop manufacturing and selling the older 100-watt incandescent light bulbs per the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 that came into effect on the 1st of January. This energy act aims to reduce the use of 75-watt and 60-watt bulbs too and these are expected to be phased out by 2014. Statistics indicate that over half the homeowners in the United States are not aware of these legislation changes. Nearly seventy seven percent of the population is still using incandescent bulbs for lighting their homes.

The company BulbAmerica is offering customers CFLs (Compact fluorescent lamps) and high efficiency incandescent light bulbs that enable them to save plenty of energy without a large upfront investment. These bulbs are 28 percent more energy efficient when compared to standard light bulbs and they also last for at least 2-3 years.

Though the new light bulbs will be brighter and more expensive, they give off less heat and the technology used enables the gases to emit light using very little energy. As the largest wholesale provider of quality lighting fixtures and light bulbs in the US, BulbAmerica is offering their customers an exhaustive selection of these new halogen bulbs that are 25 percent more efficient. In recent years, people have become environmentally aware and they have started using these new bulbs that also save them money in the long run. Apart from these light bulbs, a new product line of and LEDs (light-emitting diodes) that use 85 percent less energy when compared to the old-fashioned incandescent bulbs are also available for purchase.

A lighting expert at BulbAmerica.com explains, “Customers will make this switch to more energy efficient light bulbs that offer immediate savings on electricity bills” adding that, “It is measures like these that will help us reduce our carbon footprint and also minimize our overall energy consumption.” With energy conservation being high on the priority list, BulbAmerica is stocking up on the latest products available in the market.

BulbAmerica offers a wide array of quality LED light bulbs, stage, and studio products from internationally renowned and trusted brands like Ushio, Osram-Sylvania, Feit Electric, etc. Focused on offering customers quality and energy efficient lighting products, they have been a part of the industry for about 10 years now. To take a look at the different product and lighting solutions that they offer at BulbAmerica, visit http://www.bulbamerica.com or call 1-877-650-0775.

BulbAmerica Presents the Latest News on the Safety of Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

Quote startThese CFL's are marketed as safe products but can
potentially damage the liver, brain, kidneys,
and the CNS on if the light bulbs are broken,
cracked, or not disposed off properly.Quote end

BulbAmerica.com, a leading provider of various lighting systems and solutions offers the latest news regarding the use and safety of CFL'S or compact fluorescent bulbs. It is important to understand the real risks associated with the popular CFL Light Bulb.

BulbAmerica, a leading wholesale retailer of quality lighting fixtures and light bulbs in the United States is an environmentally conscious company that believes in offering all their customers reliable and trustworthy information regarding various lighting products. A recent study conducted by Peter Braun in Berlin’s Alab Laboratory revealed that the compact and environmentally-friendly CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) that are going to replace the age old incandescent light bulbs contain carcinogenic substances.

Some of these toxic and cancer causing substances include phenol, naphthalene, and styrene. Scientists in Germany are strongly advising people to use these bulbs sparingly and only in areas that have good ventilation as these bulbs are now known to generate electrical smog that is extremely harmful. A professor of biology at Haifa University in Israel, Abraham Haim found that the likelihood of women getting breast cancer increased due to the light emitted by Compact Fluorescent Bulbs. This light disrupts the production of the hormone melatonin in the body.

Says a lighting expert at BulbAmerica, “These CFL's are marketed as safe products but can potentially damage the liver, brain, kidneys, and the CNS only if the light bulbs are broken, cracked, or not disposed off properly.” CFLs are also known to produce radiation that is also associated with a number of health defects including, but not limited to dizziness, headaches, weakness, sleep abnormalities, fatigue, and migraine headaches. With the government’s decision to go ahead with banning the sale of 100 watt traditional incandescent light bulbs with the 75-watt version of toxic CFLs by January 1, 2012, people might be forced to use these compact fluorescents.

BulbAmerica is the largest wholesale provider of quality lighting fixtures and light bulbs in the United States. They have been a part of the industry for almost a decade now and are renowned for offering quality products that include fluorescent, halogen light, LED, CFL, and incandescent bulbs, projector lamps, and various LED lighting options including LED strips. For more information about the light bulbs that they offer at BulbAmerica, visit http://www.bulbamerica.com or call 1-877-650-0775.

Monday, March 5, 2012

When it comes to light bulbs, many consumers need some enlightenment.
 
The first round of a federally-mandated phase-out of traditional incandescent light bulbs that will be done over a three-year period began on Jan. 1. But according to press materials from The Home Depot, recent reports from The United States Department of Energy indicate that a large percentage of consumers are not informed about the upcoming changes in lighting options. And with those who are, there’s been some resistance toward new efficiency and labeling standards that will eventually force an across-the-board switch to bulbs that use less energy.

Ted Leszczynski, electrical department head at The Home Depot in West Norriton, sheds some light on the subject.

“The initial (Jan. 1) phase-out was only for 100-watt bulbs, and people … are under the impression it was all incandescent bulbs,” Leszczynski said.

      In January 2013, 75-watt bulbs will be phased out, and in Jan. 2014, the 40- and 60-watt bulbs go. Phased out bulbs can no longer be manufactured or imported but can be sold in stores as long as they’re in stock.

“We still have a good amount of 100 watts left,” Leszczynski said. “(Customers) say, ‘I know I can’t get these anymore,’ and I say, ‘Well you can get them, because we still have them, but I’ll always give them their other options.”

The alternatives are LED bulbs and compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs), and Leszczynski said he offers them to customers in that order.

“Through the life of a compact fluorescent you save maybe $50, because the life of the bulb is less (than an LED),” he said.

“Everybody that comes in kind of shies away from the LED’s, which is actually your best bang for your buck. But they’re a little pricey right now, so your average bulb can cost you somewhere between $22 and $39, but it will last you like 22 years.

“With the compact fluorescent, “ Leszczynski continued, “if you got a 65-watt compatible four-pack, you’re paying $7, and that will last roughly seven years.

Thursday, March 1, 2012

LEDs: The Future of Lighting is Here

So, what does the little indicator light on your cell phone, a street light, an exit sign, and the common household light bulb have in common? If your answer is that light emitting diode (LED) technology can power all these things, then you're pretty bright.

LEDs are a form of solid state lighting. Once the new kid on the block, LEDs have emerged as one of today's most energy-efficient and rapidly growing technologies. There are a wide variety of LED products available in the market, with the technology found in automobiles, computers, televisions, recessed downlights in the kitchen, flashlights, and holiday lights. LEDs are different than other types of lighting in that they last longer, are more durable, and save more energy and money. They also emit almost no heat. By comparison, inefficient incandescent lighting gives off 90% of their energy as heat.

In comparing energy-efficient light bulbs with incandescent bulbs, if you pay $8 to light a space in your home with a traditional bulb, you would pay about $2 to light the safe space with an LED. ENERGY STAR-qualified LEDs use only 20%–25% of the energy and last up to 25 times longer than the traditional incandescent bulbs they replace. While LED light bulbs are more expensive at this stage, as with other electronics, prices are coming down as more products enter the market.

In the outdoor lighting space, LEDs are impacting the sustainability initiatives of corporations and municipalities. WalMart now uses LED technology to meet updated DOE specifications for high-efficiency parking lot lighting, and is upgrading more than 250 existing lots. The company reports energy savings of 58% compared with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, a widely used commercial building code. In comparing the performance of LED roadway lighting with high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting in New York City, LEDs showed energy savings from 26 to 57%. Other major organizations, such as Lowe's, MGM Resorts International, and the U.S. General Services Administration are also considering upgrading their lighting to cut costs, reduce energy use, and increase their competitiveness.

As the adoption of LEDs grows, their energy saving potential can be enormous for the nation. According to a recent DOE report, by 2030, energy savings from LEDs can be up to 300 terawatt-hours, or the equivalent annual energy output of about 50, 1,000 megawatt power plants. At today's energy prices, this equates to approximately $30 billion in savings. These energy savings would also reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 210 million metric tons of carbon, and decrease the electricity consumption equivalent to powering 24 million homes.

Source: ECN